Greater Clark County Schools Expand For The Future With Five-Year Slippery Facility Plan

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In response to the business boom in southern Indiana, the Greater Clark County School District is expanding its facilities to accommodate the expected growth in student enrollment. Superintendent Mark Laughner paid attention to trends “Two of the last three years we’ve seen enrollment growth,” Laughner said. “This last year with COVID, it was kind of the way things went at the start of the year, we saw a bit of a downturn.” But the two years of growth were enough for Laughner and other district administrators to see the need to be able to accommodate more students. “There’s a tremendous amount of projects going on, whether it’s river ridges or apartment complexes or new residential housing all over Jeffersonville and Charlestown,” Laughner said. “There are two things that have really started to accelerate that growth. One – River Ridge and what’s happening at River Ridge and also the new bridge. For us, those two things are in the middle of our district in the heart of Greater Clark “The district is tackling growth through an ongoing five-year plan that includes building new facilities as well as renovating others. “The five-year facilities plan was just that,” Laughner said. “First, to manage growth, but also in Greater Clark, we have a lot of aging and older facilities that are 60 to 70 years old that need a lot of attention and frankly cause us as district a lot more money to operate in. In three or four years we’re really going to transform what our facilities will look like in Greater Clark with the two new elementarys, tackle Jeff High’s pool, do something with Park Elementary Wood in Clarksville, building a new college that will replace Park View and just other things that will happen in the future in terms of dealing with some sporting things.” Because we have such high assessed value growth, we can do these projects and it won’t raise the tax rate one penny,” Laughner said. Elementary schools are expected to be built next year. Laughner said that enrollment in study projects in the district will increase by nearly 1,000 students over the next few years.

In response to the business boom in southern Indiana, the Greater Clark County School District is expanding its facilities to accommodate the expected growth in student enrollment.

Superintendent Mark Laughner paid attention to trends

“Two of the last three years we’ve seen enrollment growth,” Laughner said. “This last year with COVID, it was kind of the way things were at the start of the year, we saw a bit of a downturn.”

But the two years of growth were enough for Laughner and other district administrators to see the need to accommodate more students.

“There’s a tremendous amount of projects going on, whether it’s river ridges or apartment complexes or new residential housing all over Jeffersonville and Charlestown,” Laughner said. “There are two things that have really started to accelerate that growth. One – River Ridge and what’s happening at River Ridge and also the new bridge. For us, those two things are in the middle of our district in the heart of Greater Clark . “

The district is tackling growth with an ongoing five-year plan that includes building new facilities as well as renovating others.

“The five-year facilities plan was just that,” Laughner said. “First, to manage growth, but also in Greater Clark, we have a lot of aging and older facilities that are 60 to 70 years old that need a lot of attention and frankly cause us as district a lot more money to operate in. In three or four years we’re really going to transform what our facilities will look like in Greater Clark with the two new elementarys, tackle Jeff High’s pool, do something with Park Elementary Wood in Clarksville, building a new college that will replace Park View and just other things that will happen in the future in terms of dealing with some sporting things.”

Even with the projected $80 million price tag, Laughner said residents have more than just updated facilities to look forward to.

“Because we have such high assessed value growth, we can do these projects and it won’t raise the tax rate one penny,” Laughner said.

Elementary schools are expected to be built next year.

Laughner said enrollment in study projects in the district will increase by nearly 1,000 students over the next few years.

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